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Don’t Overlook This Unique Prospecting Opportunity

Money is the top cause of stress in the U.S. Everyday people carry with them financial worries for which they need solutions. And Americans tend to be most worried about their financial future, not trusting themselves to make the best decisions. As they look for answers, advisors have a unique opportunity to provide needed guidance.

On this episode of Elementality, Reese and Carl illustrate the power of a single answer. By having their most acute issue solved first, a prospective client is often eager to begin more involved planning discussions. That one answer becomes an entry point where trust begins and can be built upon. And it’s why, “I answer financial questions for a living. Do you have any?” may be the best conversation starter an advisor can use.

 


Podcast Transcript

Carl Richards:
Imagine how easy it is for somebody. What do you do for a living? You’re PT. What do you do for a living? Well, I answer financial questions for a living.

Reese Harper:
Yeah.

Carl Richards:
Right? I answer financial questions for… Do you have any?

Reese Harper:
Yeah.

Carl Richards:
Boom. My car.

Reese Harper:
Yeah.

Carl Richards:
Interesting. Right.

Reese Harper:
Boom.

Carl Richards:
Keep going.

Reese Harper:
Remodel.

Carl Richards:
Yeah.

Reese Harper:
Boom. I’ve got a horse and I’m thinking about buying a horse, like property for myself.

Carl Richards:
Yeah. Can I afford that? I don’t know if I can afford that.

Reese Harper:
I’ve got some idle cash in the bank. These are four questions that she asked like right in a row.

Carl Richards:
Yeah.

Reese Harper:
I mean, I’m… This is beautiful prospecting.

[music]

Jordan Haines:
Welcome to Elementality. I’m Jordan Haynes, Financial Planning Specialist at Elements. Each episode Reese Harper and Carl Richards will explore the major challenges faced by financial advisors, and the things they can do to manage the functional, emotional, and social jobs of delivering real financial advice to real clients. We hope you enjoy this episode.

[music]

Reese Harper:
Welcome to another episode of Elementality, everybody. I’m your host Reese Harper, here with my trusty old cohost Carl Richards.

Carl Richards:
Greetings Reese. [chuckle]

Reese Harper:
You have so many cool nicknames. I’m still like trying to figure out which one I like. People call you all kinds of Sherpa and Yoda and St. Carl and I affectionately started today with the mountain GOAT, the G-O-A-T, the Greatest Of All Time.

Carl Richards:
I swear I’m gonna leave soon if you don’t stop with this. [laughter]

Reese Harper:
I like the mountain GOAT. I’m Actually really liking this one lately. It’s not quite as sophisticated as I think other people are giving you. They’re like naming you, like Yoda and like…

Carl Richards:
St. Carl was yeah.

Reese Harper:
St. Carl was Josh Brown.

Carl Richards:
Josh Brown. Yeah.

Reese Harper:
That’s pretty high praise.

[laughter]

Carl Richards:
Yeah. It’s a little uncomfortable. I like the sentiment it’s pointing to…

Reese Harper:
I do too.

Carl Richards:
But it’s very uncomfortable to talk about.

Reese Harper:
Yeah. The mountain GOAT to me, that’s how I knew you.

Carl Richards:
Oh you know what kids just called us the other day? Kids just call me Bill Murray of financial planning.

Reese Harper:
Oh, wow.

Carl Richards:
He kinda like sneaks around at…

Reese Harper:
Taking a different spin.

Carl Richards:
Sneaks around at the conferences and does funny things. Yeah.

Reese Harper:
Okay. Well, you know one of my favorite shows of all time is What about Bob.

Carl Richards:
Oh yeah of course.

Reese Harper:
And interacting…

Carl Richards:
Isn’t that Sailing? Sailing, I’m a sailor.

Reese Harper:
I sail. Yeah. This is great. You actually… I don’t know. I would not have thought of that.

Carl Richards:
Yeah. Me neither.

Reese Harper:
Shout out to Michael but…

Carl Richards:
I think it was because I showed up at a conference unannounced, and I asked if I could be the mic runner.

Reese Harper:
Okay. It’s just like you showing up at Lake Winnipesaukee.

Carl Richards:
Yeah. Well, apparently he does all sorts of things like that. Like shows up at softball games and is the pitcher…

Reese Harper:
Oh, like for real.

Carl Richards:
For real.

Reese Harper:
Okay. I didn’t know that.

Carl Richards:
He’ll go to a wedding and take photo… He’ll take the camera from the photographer.

Reese Harper:
Okay. All right. Well, maybe I could be persuaded. He’s one of my favorite actor, so yeah.

Carl Richards:
Yeah. Anyway.

Reese Harper:
All right, moving on.

Carl Richards:
Today we have a pretty exciting topic ahead of us. I’m gonna start out with having you tell us an analogy of going into the ER. Elements does a lot of comparisons to the medical industry, partly just because I think health and finances are kind of the two biggest stressors in our lives. You were just joking about an analogy prior to this, I think it’s actually quite effective.

Reese Harper:
Yeah, yeah, no. I mean, I just… This all starts from the idea that, like no one wakes up with a financial planning problem, you don’t. And often we’re like, we try to… “Sorry, I can’t help you unless we have a financial plan,” like that whole idea. I was just thinking through like, imagine showing up at the ER with like whatever. I’m walking after dinner and somebody jumps out of the bushes and a knife in my leg.

Carl Richards:
Yeah.

Reese Harper:
Which is a terrible idea, but let’s just pretend like it happened. Right? A knife in my leg, I don’t… That has not ever come close…

Carl Richards:
A Buck knife.

Reese Harper:
Yeah. Buck knife. Exactly. I was… I’m hunting with a friend and his knife gets loose and it ends up in my leg. I show up in the ER and the ER’s like, of course… You’re pointing at the knife and they’re saying, “Your cholesterol levels, we need to check that first. Like your heart… Like how’s your diet? Have you… Do you have anxiety? Like, do you deal with like… ” You’re like, “No, brother, I just have a knife in my leg, can we get this out? I don’t really care what you talk to me about right now, I don’t need a comprehensive blood panel done, I don’t need my cholesterol checked by 17 different labs. I need the knife out of my leg.” And I think one thing that we need to get a little better at, is realizing like people have acute problems. No one shows up. And I get… Like, I have to be clear about this because I know that’s… I don’t… The real value you provide is not getting the knife out of the leg, it’s not the acute problem, that’s not the real value. The real value is the stuff way behind that.

Carl Richards:
Yeah.

Reese Harper:
Like what’s the sense of financial purpose, but most people… Nobody has ever shown up at a financial advisor’s office ever, as far as I’m aware, ever, and said, “Hey, I’d like to just cry on your couch for a minute and have you help me clarify my goals. Could you… Hey, Reese, could you help me with my statement of financial purpose?” It’s never happened.

Carl Richards:
Yeah.

Reese Harper:
They show up because “I sold a business, I need life insurance, my portfolio managed by the joker down the street’s terrible.” They’ve got an acute problem, and sometimes we don’t… We’re not good at embracing and empathizing with the acute problem. And then using… I like to think of using the acute problem as a righteous trick, just an entry point. If I can help solve that acute problem and then slowly help them understand that it’s actually not the thing that matters.

Carl Richards:
Yeah.

Reese Harper:
The thing that matters long term, is these deeper questions.

Carl Richards:
And I think you can jump into that deeper topic quite quickly.

Reese Harper:
Yeah. I think the knife in the leg is probably a terrible example for that.

Carl Richards:
I don’t know, I like it.

Reese Harper:
But it could be like, you could show up at a chiropractor. Right? And like, “I can’t lift my back at all.” Well, the chiropractor’s gotta treat that, but we all know that that is not the result of something that just happened on accidents. Oh, did you realize you’ve been sitting on your wallet for 30 years and it’s 2 inches thick like George Costanza’s and you’ve got ketchup in there. Like the… Like now the chiropractor has a way… I gotta solve this problem, but I need to enter into this longer term challenge.

Carl Richards:
Yeah.

Reese Harper:
Yeah. I think that’s really, really insightful and really important to get. If you’re trying to grow your practice, if you’re trying to augment your influence.

Carl Richards:
Trying to help more people.

Reese Harper:
You’re trying to help more people. And you know, this is another episode in our series around kind of the industry. And we talked a lot about the blue ocean, the pie that is so… The impact pie, right? That’s so big for us to go and just have a little slice of all of these, tens of millions of households that have never had their question answered. I think that’s how you get in there. You get into that, but not by selling financial planning, even if that’s ultimately what you feel like is part of the solution. You’re selling an answer to a question.

Reese Harper:
Totally.

Carl Richards:
That’s cost effective. It’s high pain, and it’s fun. I started doing this a while back when I just walk up to somebody, that I knew and I just said, “Hey, can I ask you just briefly, like, do you have any financial questions on the top of your mind right now? Things you’re like worried about.” And I don’t think I’ve ever had anyone not give me one.

Reese Harper:
Right.

Carl Richards:
Like I get one everytime. I mean, it’s amazing how many questions people carry. And daily and it changes daily. And those are the things that get someone to take some action. And so usually it’s… I told this example last time, just it’s so recent on top of mind, it’s been a fun one to kind of think about, but I was getting my back worked on from wrecking up in the mountains, close to your place on my onewheel with my son. I decided to try to climb a PCMR on [chuckle] my onewheel. My son handled it really nicely. I made it all the way to the top, and I’m coming flying down the hill and I went over a really steep decline and didn’t lean forward enough, I kinda leaned backward. My onewheel just scooted out and I kind of got wrecked.

Carl Richards:
And so that’s an aside folks. It doesn’t have anything to do with the story, but I needed to get that off my chest so Carl knew how I wrecked. Anyway, I’m visiting with my PT, she’s straightening out my back and I was just like practice it there. I’m like, do you have a… You know, do you have any financial questions that are on the top of your mind? I mean, it was like a lot, like there was like 10. And I just grabbed the first one and the first one was, how much should I put down on my car.

Reese Harper:
Yeah.

Carl Richards:
Like I’m about to buy a new car and I’ve been waiting for four years. And I just I don’t know how much I should put down. And that was the now I’ve got… If I would’ve said like, hey, have you ever thought about like getting a comprehensive financial plan done? Or, hey, have you ever thought… Like before I asked you the financial question question.

Reese Harper:
Well, think too, just about, this is a, like the dreaded elevator pitch, which I’ve been so anti forever, I hate elevator pitches. Imagine…

Carl Richards:
None of us can actually figure out our elevator pitch anyway, they’re horrible.

Reese Harper:
They’re stupid, they’re terrible, it’s tension… But imagine how easy it is for somebody. What do you do for a living, you’re PT? What do you do for a living? I answer financial questions for a living.

Carl Richards:
Yeah.

Reese Harper:
Right. I answer financial questions… Do you have any?

Carl Richards:
Yeah.

Reese Harper:
Boom. My car.

Carl Richards:
Yeah.

Reese Harper:
Interesting. Right.

Carl Richards:
Boom.

Reese Harper:
Keep going.

Carl Richards:
Remodel.

Reese Harper:
Yeah.

Carl Richards:
Boom. I’ve got a horse. And I’m thinking about buying a horse, like property for myself.

Reese Harper:
Yeah. Can I afford that? I don’t know if I can afford it.

Carl Richards:
I’ve got some idle cash in the bank. These are like four questions that she asked like right in a row. I mean, I’m… This is beautiful prospecting.

Reese Harper:
Yeah.

Carl Richards:
Right? You’ve got the pain exposed. The pain is the question. Now you have… You got a choice because if you answer this question right now for that person, you’re gonna lose them.

Reese Harper:
Can I just tell a quick story?

Carl Richards:
Yeah.

Reese Harper:
This is really important. What Reese’s about to talk about is really important. There are two things have to happen. One you have to diagnose correctly and second, and it’s a separate issue. The client has to feel diagnosed correctly. And this is a little righteous trick. It’s a game we play. And the story I wanna tell real quickly is I have a friend who she is Russian and she’s an ER doctor. And she… The Russian part’s important because she says it’s important. She said, because I’m Russian, I’m tend to be more direct than most people, like that’s her description of herself. And she used to tell me this story where she would walk out. She would walk to the window from inside the emergency room where she could see the waiting room.

Reese Harper:
And she used to look across the waiting room at everybody in there. So there’s like 17 people sitting in there. And she used to say, she said she could tell almost immediately who were the people that just need ibuprofen and go home. Like she could almost, she’s just like, I could just look and tell, this is after 10 years of pattern recognition. She just knew. And she said she wanted to so badly to just go into the foyer and say, “How many of you would like the whole circus, the whole show, the thing where we do the test and we take you back versus how many of you would just like to be told to go home and take ibuprofen?” If that’s the right answer.

Reese Harper:
But she never could do that. And she said she’s had two complaints in 10 years, the two complaints were not about misdiagnosis. They were about not feel… Like she wasn’t nice enough. She didn’t take enough time. The diagnosis was correct. And I think that’s really important for us to understand what you’re pointing at is there is some level you are so good and I’m pointing to you financial advisors, right? You’re so good at pattern recognition quickly that you may know the answer super fast, but there’s a game that’s gotta be played. And that game is they’ve gotta feel diagnosed.

[music]

Abby Morton:
Hey, Elementality listeners, it’s Abby. The Elements financial monitoring system is revolutionizing how you attract, onboard and deliver ongoing advice to clients. So you can scale your business far beyond traditional limits. If you want to profitably help way more people make smart financial decisions, head over to getelements.com/demo and schedule a time to see it in action today.

[music]

Reese Harper:
To add to that, this is an and I think these are functional and emotional jobs like I’ve talked about for a while and I… You can’t forget that this whole thing is an emotional job. It’s not a functional job. Like the answer to the question’s actually not that important. What’s important is that she feels understood and heard and that she feels like I am actually providing advice that’s aligned with her and the best way to do that. The first thing I did, I said, “You know I can answer that. I think I can answer those questions for you. Before I do that, there’s one thing that I want to know just in advance of answering that question, because how I answer it actually is completely dependent on you.”

Reese Harper:
And I said, “Why is money important to you?” And I went right into the statement of financial purpose. Right. And I got her to describe like, “My gosh, well, money for me is really, like… ” She says, I think it’s… I said, “Why is money important to you?” She’s like “I think it’s being able to pay for the things that are kind of like the have-to’s, but have some freedom to be more with my horse and my property, like, I don’t have horse property, I’ve always wanted it. Money to me would be like, I’m meeting my bills, so I’m not worried. And I’m able to be with my horse on this property.” And I’m just like…

Carl Richards:
Boom.

Reese Harper:
Boom! Now, we’ve got… So now we can go somewhere. And so now I know that the goal probably for her of pursuing this purpose of hers, I mean the amount of liquidity that you pay down on a car has a pretty direct impact on what, at this income level, her income level, which I didn’t even know yet, to be honest, I hadn’t even talked about income. Haven’t talked about spending. I just knew that there’s some.

Carl Richards:
State of retirement.

Reese Harper:
Yeah, there’s some correlation here between giving up cash to have more equity in a car, and pursuing some kind of future with horse property that are not totally aligned. And so what I ended up saying, that second thing I said, okay, okay. I restated her statement of financial purpose back to her. That takes two, you know, like a minute, maybe we’re a minute in right. Ask a question, we’re two minutes in, and I’ve got statement of financial purpose roughly down. And I just said, now before I answer the question about your car, I said, it’s really good. Now that I know that this, that I stated back statement of financial purpose and she kind of restates it back and we felt both aligned.

Reese Harper:
And I said “Have you ever heard of the concept of liquidity or like having enough money to access? That’s what we call liquidity.” I said, “I measure that with a scorecard. And before I told you how much to put down, it’d really be nice for me to know how long you could last right now on your spending, just based on the amount of savings you have piled up and everything.” I just show… I told her there’s a score, and it measures a number of years that you could live on your current liquidity after tax and cash. And I said, if you have like probably a 0.5 score, which is 0.5 years, I said… I might answer it a certain way. If you have a one, it might be another way. If you have a 0.25 I would definitely answer it a different way.

Reese Harper:
I’m like, do you know what, by chance, if you take your, what you’ve got divided by what you spend, do you know how long it could last or what your score might be? She kind of… Of course, she’s gonna have a hard time doing all that math in her head perfectly, but it piqued her curiosity a lot when I said the amount of down payment that I would recommend doing probably dependent on how much liquidity you have right now because I’d want you to be healthy and safe and stable. And I said, the system I look at, generally the closer someone is to one on that, one year’s worth of spending, the less I care about whether they pay down the car faster or not, it’s kind of an option, a preference at that point. But if you’re well below that it might… I probably would wait, do you know what your score is?

Reese Harper:
So I’m giving her some general advice. I’m not telling her what to do yet. I’m just instructing her mental model around how to think about the problem. It’s more comprehensive in how I’m addressing it. And then my invitation to her was, “Hey, I promise to get you an answer before the end of the day, but would you mind if I just had you fill out your scorecard for me, and then I’ll send you a quick video, just answering your question?” And dude, I mean, it’s just like…

Carl Richards:
Again the question was the entry point.

Reese Harper:
The question was the entry point.

Carl Richards:
Yep. ‘Cause she didn’t wake up in the morning with a financial planning problem.

Reese Harper:
Yes.

Carl Richards:
She didn’t wake up with an invest… How do I invest… An efficiently designed portfolio problem. She didn’t wake up with a evidence based portfolio design problem.

Reese Harper:
No.

Carl Richards:
She woke up with a financial question.

Reese Harper:
Now. I don’t know. And it takes some training to use the scorecard to answer the questions.

Carl Richards:
Sure.

Reese Harper:
And a financial advisor could learn it in about 30 minutes.

Carl Richards:
Right. But the point here really is the power of realizing that financial questions are the entry point. And using that as a business development tool.

Reese Harper:
The business development side is kind of, what’s the most important… I think not the most important, it’s what I wanted to emphasize here is I think we are missing the… Like she’s now what I would consider a part of the funnel, right? My marketing funnel. Now she’s in the top of my funnel. She’s actually moved down into the middle of my funnel.

Carl Richards:
Of course.

Reese Harper:
Right and…

Carl Richards:
She’s filled out a score card. She’s answered a rough statement of financial purpose. And this was all in 23 minutes.

Reese Harper:
And the cool thing is I remembered that conversation. I’m on the massage table, so I’m not able to like do much there in terms of typing or entering data. But I got up walking out, I invited her in and by the time I had gotten home, she’d already filled out her net worth statement. And she’d already filled out most of her scorecard. I was able to just key in in about 30 seconds her statement of financial purpose just so that we had it in her one-page plan.

Carl Richards:
Which I can already remember, like I want the freedom to spend time with my horses.

Reese Harper:
And I was like, okay, now I’m just gonna answer that question. And then just think about, like of course there’s membership models, there’s full service planning models, there’s AUM based models, there’s combinations. There’s any number of ways I could engage, but now I’ve got a chance that I’ve delivered some… There was no advice here, I don’t… In the traditional sense of regulated advice, I haven’t gotten paid. I didn’t give her any specific investment advice. I’m just giving some guidance and general financial education around her balance sheet. And she’s so deep into the funnel and I’ve spent like five cumulative minutes. But it all started with going with the question first. You focus on that question and you use the question to get the person to start understanding how you could answer questions better if you just have good data.

Carl Richards:
Yeah.

Reese Harper:
If you just a have good data, you could answer questions faster, more efficiently. And now every time that question comes up, she can… Every question now, you’re gonna be the person for every question, ’cause not only did you train her to engage from the beginning, but she’s going to want to think of you every time a question comes up. Every time you’re the question answer fast, efficient, quick. It’s just like a really different angle than like planning, financial… Think about the things that would not be interesting. Financial literacy, financial education…

Carl Richards:
Estate planning.

Reese Harper:
Estate planning. Financial planning, retirement planning.

Carl Richards:
Cashflow analysis.

Reese Harper:
Cashflow… Oh my gosh.

Carl Richards:
Which is kind of the question that you would never… Like can I buy a car? “Yes. Let me do a cashflow analysis on you.” One thing that I think’s interesting, just purely from a business development problem. Specifically for business development. Like we struggle so much with business development in our industry. Some of the… Any real financial planner is not particularly good at marketing or business development, but imagine if you could really simply find a population of people who have a common question. This is how I normally describe niche marketing is you find a group of people who have a common problem, the cool thing about the shortcut to finding a group of people with a common problem is an occupation. The cool thing about knowing an occupation and their common… I’m gonna change from problem to question, is that, you know where they hang out, you know what magazines they read, you know what podcasts they listen to, you know what conferences they go to.

Carl Richards:
But imagine now the ability to market through questions. I was just thinking earlier, like, I don’t know who does this, but like all the big real estate companies put together a quarterly or a monthly magazine, it’s in the local grocery store. You grab it, it’s free. It’s got all the listings. But imagine how much different an ad is that says, “How much are you gonna put down on your house?” Right. “I can help you answer that question, fill out this… Snap a picture of this QR code or go to this website, fill out this questionnaire and we’ll spend 30 minutes interpreting it for you.” Or “Should I pay off my student loans?” If you start thinking about the questions that people want, it’s very easy to start seeing in your head like, “Oh, there’s a population of people who have that question.” And then if I can provide at least the framework quickly, which is one of the reasons why I’m so excited about the work at Elements is the idea of finally providing the framework quickly, for my ability to answer those questions, that’s a completely different business development model than what we’ve said before.

Reese Harper:
Oh yeah. It changes everything in terms of… I just don’t think there’s pain outside of those questions. That’s the pain that the customer will always feel is something acute that day. And it’s interesting. It isn’t just these, like, it’s not just this question about a car down payment. I mean, I could give you examples at the high end of the market…

Carl Richards:
Of course.

Reese Harper:
Around, oh my gosh. Like it’s my daughter’s birthday today. How much can I gift again in, or what’s the 529 plan limits or what’s my lifetime exemption.

Carl Richards:
Yeah. I’m selling my business.

Reese Harper:
Or I’m selling my business.

Carl Richards:
What are the tax implications to that.

Reese Harper:
What’s this? Or, oh my gosh, we’re in our cabin, should we bring in a third partner? I can give you 50 questions today that I know apply across the entire market, you just… And you don’t have to know the questions, you can market really well once you do know. But you can do it just face to face with somebody.

Carl Richards:
Sure. What questions do you have?

Reese Harper:
Hey, you know, just while we’re here together, say, I’d love to just, I’m just curious, like if I’m always doing research on this. “Do you have like a financial question that’s been on the top of your mind? What is it?” Just do that every time, people are gonna be so grateful.

Carl Richards:
I’ve got so… I love that so much that it’s like, I write white papers just for fun now, just ’cause I love the research. And that question’s a pearl, like what’s the most pressing financial question on your mind right now.

Reese Harper:
Yeah.

Carl Richards:
Fascinating.

Reese Harper:
Yeah.

Carl Richards:
Super, super fun.

Reese Harper:
Gets people really engaged. So let’s try to lean into business development a bit more, as we kind of to wrapping up this episode. I think if we can lean into questions and then use those questions as a way to, like you said, a righteous trick to bring people in a little bit deeper, the reason I built Elements into one scorecard and have the topics there that are there, are because each of those topics actually matters…

Carl Richards:
You’re right.

Reese Harper:
In this holistic long term conversation, you don’t have to do them all today.

Carl Richards:
Yeah. Yeah.

Reese Harper:
But you want the client to see that there’s more to finances than just the one thing.

Carl Richards:
That they’re doing. Yeah. Yeah.

Reese Harper:
But you don’t want to get stuck doing all the things. Your cost goes through the roof and now you’ve got no freemium model, you’ve got no membership option, you’ve got no middle tier…

Carl Richards:
Just get the knife out of my leg.

Reese Harper:
Get the knife out of my leg. And then when I… I will keep coming back to you for more healing.

Carl Richards:
Hey, when it’s time, we should talk about that cholesterol problem.

Reese Harper:
Yeah. I mean, is it true? I just feel like we’re forcing too many people into an engagement that’s just unnatural.

Carl Richards:
And is not fit for purpose.

Reese Harper:
Yeah. It doesn’t meet them where they are at.

Carl Richards:
Like right sized for what they need.

Reese Harper:
All right, man. The mountain GOAT has been unleashed again, you’re crossing the Wasatch Crest with all the wisdom. I love it. And I’m excited to hear what you guys think about these episodes and what you learned about prospecting, the size of the pie, the real problem we’re facing, the cost and efficiency problem. If you haven’t checked out the one-page plan yet, it’s live, it’s amazing. Carl did some excellent work helping guide us to make sure we had this built in a way that I think is fast and efficient and emphasizes the right things. We’ve actually generated more one-page plans in the last week on our platform than… I’m not gonna make any big, giant, bold statements, but I would be… I’m very surprised at how many hundreds of plans have been generated in the last four days. It’s been really cool to see people getting to that statement of financial purpose with people really quick.

Carl Richards:
Yeah.

Reese Harper:
I’ve gotten, I don’t know if it’s a dozen texts and DMs on Twitter of people taking a picture of their statement of financial purpose with clients going like, “Here it is. I did mine.” Isn’t it crazy? That sometimes just like a tool to enable.

Carl Richards:
Yeah, yeah.

Reese Harper:
Someone to like actually take the action.

Carl Richards:
Yeah, for sure.

Reese Harper:
It’s just beautiful to see all that, those emotional jobs being serviced. So thanks again. Really appreciate it. And look forward to another episode.

Carl Richards:
Yep. Amen. Reese.

Reese Harper:
Carry on.

Abby Morton:
Next time on Elementality.

Reese Harper:
When I built Dentist Advisors, what I didn’t realize was all the power of all the emotional jobs that I started to discover that only dentists really had. And I’ve seen Colton, the fact that he’s here in South Dakota at a tattoo artist conference.

Carl Richards:
Yeah.

Reese Harper:
You know what emotional jobs and functional jobs these customers are trying to figure out. And that gives you like a massive advantage in actually doing a better job for the client.

Abby Morton:
You can learn more about the Element’s financial monitoring system at getelements.com/demo and schedule a time to talk with one of our friendly financial planning experts. Elementality’s executive creators are Reese Harper and Carl Richards. Elementality is produced by Abby Morton and directed by Jordan Haynes. Have a good one.

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